A Sibling’s Perspective- part 2


Part 2: Patience

Things that take an able-bodied person 10 minutes to do could take an SCI (a person with a spinal cord injury) two hours.  And that’s if they’re really going at it! I often lost what little patience I had to begin with because my time table was disrupted. I had to wait 10 painstaking minutes for my sister to put on her socks and shoes. First one finger in the sock then two fingers then a toe then inch by inch, tug by tug, the sock finally made it up to the arch of her foot. I fought the urge to just do it for her so we could hurry up and get to school already. Every time I would get her out of the car, I had to wait for her to adjust her body and regain her balance before we could get going. I could go on and on citing situations where I lost my temper just because I didn’t pack an extra supply of patience.

Being an able-bodied person who has to adjust their lifestyle to accommodate a family member with an SCI can be irritating and downright maddening sometimes. Unlike our wheelchair-bound family members who have no choice but to develop patience, it takes a conscious effort on our part to breathe and relax. I don’t have any protocol for how to develop patience (does it even exist?!) but I do have a few thoughts that have helped re-fill my patience tank.

1) It costs you more time to rush and make mistakes. And it’s not worth the injuries.

2) Nothing we have to do is so earth-shatteringly important that it has to be done right this very second. Even “very important” things can wait.

3) Patience is a universal virtue. Once developed, you can use it anywhere and in any situation.

 

Amanda Haddad is a graduate student from the University of Southern California, studying geochemistry and microbiology.  She was a passenger in a car accident 10 years ago when the car she was riding in rolled over in the Arizona desert.  Her sister, the owner of the For Caregivers blog, sustained a spinal cord and traumatic brain injury and their journey as siblings recovering from trauma is one that many families can relate to.

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About TheQuadfiles

The QuadFiles is designed for individuals living with paralysis and/or brain injury. It's a compilation of resources, websites, personal stories, and inspirational articles.

Posted on March 14, 2012, in Support and tagged , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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